Eva Homic, 12, Scarlet Beard, 8, and Lily Walker watch after placing flowers on the Alleluia.
Eva Homic, 12, Scarlet Beard, 8, and Lily Walker watch after placing flowers on the Alleluia.
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On Sunday, Feb. 17 at Saint Joseph’s parish in Troy, the Latin Mass community took part in “Burying the Alleluia” to mark the beginning of Septuagesima, the period of time immediately before Lent marked by sobriety and preparation. Pope Alexander II declared that the Alleluia be dismissed in a ceremony the evening before Septuagesima Sunday. Septuagesima comes from the Latin word for “seventieth,” signifying the seventieth day before Easter. Because Alleluia is associated with Easter, the burial symbolizes the “verbal fast” of the word during Lent. Historically, the privilege of “Burying the Alleluia” was given to altar boys and this ceremony takes on the character of a funeral. There is incense and a traditional hymn called the “Alleluia, Dulce Carmen” is sung.